Respecting others is a trait our parents and guardians teach us from a young age. From sharing toys to making sure you are polite in others homes; respect can be shown in many ways, but for some, it is harder to stick to. Whether it be because you are being disrespected in the moment or not even aware you are being so; it happens to the best of us. Although we aren’t blind to the fact that people that do not always mean it, it is still important to be respectful as often as possible, and sometimes that means being so even in times we don’t feel as if we should be.

Respect in environments such as school is where kids tend to show the most of it since that is where they spend most of their time, but in recent years it seems to have diminished. When it comes to student respect for teachers, “The percentage of people who agreed with the statement “students respect teachers” dropped to 31% after previously being at 79% years prior.” (Toppo, 2014). This can be due to many reasons, whether it be the influence of other students, social media and video games or the freedom of being away from parental supervision, but according to some, it is simply because “students respect teachers who respect them.” (Ferlazzo, 2019). This shows that respect needs to go both ways because everyone likes to be respected. If you show a sense of respect to someone, they are more likely to reciprocate, but for those with learning differences, respect can be taken away at times. Since some people in this world are not so kind, they can treat those with learning differences such as ADHD, Autism, Asperger’s, etc. Poorly simply because they are different. Although this is not acceptable behavior, it doesn’t mean you should be disrespectful back. It may feel right at the moment, but respect shows you are the bigger person, and ensuring you show that respect to everyone you come across will allow you to always be the better person, no matter the situation.

The reality is that we as people need to show respect even when we do not want to. Whether it be at school, work, or on the street, showing respect to those we see paints us in a light that shows we deserve respect back. Although having various abilities can make it hard at times due to social or processing differences, it is not something that cannot be integrated into daily life. With the help of the Support for Students Growth Center, respect habits such as listening, not saying something that may be harmful or unkind, being in the moment when with someone, keeping eye contact/facial contact, understanding boundaries, etc. can all be taught with the help of their experts. So, if you or your student needs aid with respect, trust SSGC to help.

Dr. Eric J. Nach, Ph.D., M.Ed., A.S.D.C., is a Developmental and Behavioral Specialist who specializes in Autism, ADHD and related disorders. Dr. Nach is the founder of the College Life Skills Program where he and his team of professional’s help develop the Emotional Maturity, Executive Functioning, Life Skill and Social Abilities of college students and those high school students preparing for college. The CollegeLSP is a subsidiary program of the Support For Students Growth Center, located in Boca Raton, FL and providing services nationwide.

 

Toppo, G. (2014, January 23). Respect at school in decline, survey shows. USA Today. Retrieved May 22, 2022, from https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/01/23/respect-schools-teachers-parents-students/4789283/

Ferlazzo, L. (2021, March 5). ‘students respect teachers who they feel respect them’ (opinion). Education Week. Retrieved May 22, 2022, from https://www.edweek.org/teaching-learning/opinion-students-respect-teachers-who-they-feel-respect-them/2019/09

 

Manners are typically taught to children from a young age. Keeping your elbows off the table, not chewing with your mouth open, saying please and thank you, etc. are what our parents teach us are the most important traits to have, but as you get older, the definition of manners begins to change. Then, we are taught that maintaining eye contact, paying attention fully to what another person is saying, etc. Is what is consider important manners to society, but for those with unique abilities such as ADHD, Autism, and Asperger’s, these manners can be harder to adapt to.

Everyone has a different opinion about what the most important manner is. Some think it is saying excuse me while others believe it is saying thank you, but either way, to them manners overall are important. It helps us as people make a good impression on others and develop connections since no one wants to be around someone who lacks manners, but some have a harder time developing them than others. When asked, one-third of 1,000 people say that they believe Americans have poor manners, which is about 333 of the people surveyed. (Onion, 2006). No one wants to be called rude. It is an insult not only to you, but to those who taught you manners, but for some, it is not purposeful. Those with unique abilities can have issues maintaining eye contact in conversations, or being fully present when in a conversation, which for some may come off rude, but it may be simply just because they are not fully aware of the fact that they are doing such a thing. (NIH, n.d.). It is not meant to be rude, but in today’s society, these actions are not considered proper manners, which is okay. It is okay to admit that as a person you struggle with maintaining societal norms of what is and isn’t considered proper manners, but it is also something that is able to be taught.

The best part about being a student is how easily you can learn. Information is sucked into your mind like a sponge, and the Support for Students Growth Center knows that, which is why they offer programs to help teach students from elementary to college, skills such as manners. Manners are so important in life. It helps maintain friendships, provides a good foundation for finding and keeping jobs, and even allows for acquaintances to think highly of you. If people are always saying how wonderful and great your manners are, word gets around quickly and allows for more opportunities to come, whether it be in relationships or work, which is why if you are struggling, you should trust the Support for Students Growth Center to help.

Dr. Eric J. Nach, Ph.D., M.Ed., A.S.D.C., is a Developmental and Behavioral Specialist who specializes in Autism, ADHD and related disorders. Dr. Nach is the founder of the College Life Skills Program where he and his team of professional’s help develop the Emotional Maturity, Executive Functioning, Life Skill and Social Abilities of college students and those high school students preparing for college. The CollegeLSP is a subsidiary program of the Support For Students Growth Center, located in Boca Raton, FL and providing services nationwide.

Onion, Amanda. “Have Americans Forgotten Their Manners?” ABC News, ABC News Network, 6 Jan. 2006, https://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=118277&page=1.

“What Are Some Signs of Learning Disabilities?” Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/learning/conditioninfo/signs.

Eyes are the window to the soul. It’s been a saying for generations. They can expose a plethora of human emotions. Happy tears, sad tears, a sparkle when you’re happy, or a narrowing when you’re mad. Eyes are a wonderful thing, and they are all unique to each person you meet, which is why it’s so important to pay attention to them. Yet, some have a harder time maintaining that intimate part of a conversation. Those born with life challenges such as ADHD, Asperger’s, Autism, etc. Can find it difficult to make eye contact when partaking in social situations without even noticing, however, it is an important skill to have when interacting with those around you. It allows for an unspoken connection, and it’s more common for society to lack this ability than people think.

On average, the Austin, Texas, Company states that eye contact should be maintained during 60% to 70% of a conversation in order to evoke a “sense of emotional connection,” but it is found that adults tend to only maintain it 30% to 60% of the time (Shellenbarger, 2013). Despite this number being lower than what is statistically deemed able to make an emotional connection, it still can create that bond, but those with life challenges still avoid it because they feel the opposite. Maintaining eye contact can be overwhelming for someone with autism, causing sensory issues, but it can also be linked to a “lack of social motivation” a hard time “focusing on both eyes and language” and/or “may not even realize they are not watching a person’s eyes” (Rudy, 2022). This can make it more difficult for people with such life challenges to make and maintain meaningful friends and partnerships. It can also make it more difficult for them to express themselves, and understand the expressions of others, but it is something that can be taught.

The Support for Student Growth Center is a program that can help those with life challenges learn social skills like eye contact so they can experience and share this sense of connection. Eye contact is told to people from a young age that it is needed to be polite. It allows for people to look into one another and understand what they may not be saying. It allows for society to see another part of people. Eyes are beautifully special to you. This is why if you or someone you love is having a hard time maintaining eye contact, you should let the Support for Students Growth Center help in order to make this an absent-minded part of their daily life. Getting a job, partaking in interviews, giving presentations, or even holding conversations require this skill, and although those who struggle with it may have to consciously make this a part of their life for the first part, the Students Growth Center will make it as easy as signing up for any of their services.

Dr. Eric J. Nach, Ph.D., M.Ed., A.S.D.C., is a Developmental and Behavioral Specialist who specializes in Autism, ADHD and related disorders. Dr. Nach is the founder of the College Life Skills Program where he and his team of professional’s help develop the Emotional Maturity, Executive Functioning, Life Skill and Social Abilities of college students and those high school students preparing for college. The CollegeLSP is a subsidiary program of the Support For Students Growth Center, located in Boca Raton, FL and providing services nationwide.

Rudy, L. J. (2022, January 11). Is the lack of eye contact a symptom of autism? Verywell Health. Retrieved February 24, 2022, from https://www.verywellhealth.com/autism-symptoms-and-eye-contact-260565

Shellenbarger, S. (2013, May 28). Just look me in the eye already. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 24, 2022, from https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887324809804578511290822228174

Summer 2022 Progr Flyer

Bullying has been around for generations. It is so prevalent that the actions of students being rude to one another are portrayed in movies to this day, yet what isn’t seen is realistic conflict resolution. Wearing a pretty dress to the prom is nice, but life isn’t a movie, so fixing all of your problems comes much harder than that. Over 3.2 million students each year fall victim to bullying (Whyinc, N.D.), and such a high number means the probability of you or your child experiencing bullying is also high, which is why it is important to teach them how to properly go about resolving such an issue. Of American students, 17% report being bullied two to three times a month, and by age 14, only 40% of girls and 30% of boys will talk to their peers about bullying (Whyinc, N.D.). This lack of willingness to talk about their experiences with bullying is what makes their ability to solve such issues on their own that much more important since if they will not be seeking outside help, they need to know how to handle conflict themselves.

Society tends to not like people who are different despite those differences making us who we are, which is why some are more susceptible to this kind of behavior from those around them. Students with life challenges such as ADHD, Asperger’s, Autism, Learning Differences, etc., are two to three times more likely to experience bullying when compared to their peers who do not experience such life challenges. This can make education harder for them, and due to the nature of some life challenges, understanding the steps to get to a resolution can come harder for them as well. Understanding social cues, what behaviors are and are not acceptable when facing a bully, and how to properly manage their emotions when and after getting bullied is crucial to the resolution process, and the Support for Students Growth Center can make the process of learning these skills so much easier, for all students.

For those in school, bullying is almost inevitable. Whether it happens to them or their friends, the ability to step in is going to be needed at one point or another. Learning what to say to a bully, parent, or teacher in a way that isn’t overstepping, it is important to the resolution process. Understanding how their bullying makes you or others feel, being put in scenarios to experience bullying and resolution in a safe environment and providing a space to report bullying are all ways the Support for Students Growth Center can help you or your child understand how to properly handle what can sometimes be overwhelming to face on your own. Allowing your child to learn how to resolve bullying with a program like ours can reduce the level of stress, anxiety, and other mental health issues that come with an already stressful environment such as school. Don’t let the problem become too large before getting help. Trust the Support for  Students Growth Center to help.

Dr. Eric J. Nach, Ph.D., M.Ed., A.S.D.C., is a Developmental and Behavioral Specialist who specializes in Autism, ADHD and related disorders. Dr. Nach is the founder of the College Life Skills Program where he and his team of professional’s help develop the Emotional Maturity, Executive Functioning, Life Skill and Social Abilities of college students and those high school students preparing for college. The CollegeLSP is a subsidiary program of the Support For Students Growth Center, located in Boca Raton, FL and providing services nationwide.

Bullying of students with disabilities. Students with Disabilities – National Bullying Prevention Center. (n.d.). Retrieved February 6, 2022, from https://www.pacer.org/bullying/info/students-with-disabilities/

Bullying facts & statistics. WHY Incorporated LLC. (n.d.). Retrieved February 6, 2022, from https://www.whyinc.org/bullying-facts-statistics

Body language is the mind’s subconscious way to communicate with those around us, and more often than not portray the emotions we as people don’t want to say out loud. Whether it be nervous hand movements around your crush or a quick jump in the air after getting into your dream college, our bodies seem to have a lot to say, but what happens if you can’t notice it? Some people are simply just lousy at reading body language, but for some, it can be caused by another factor, making it even more difficult for that individual to read others around them. Those who are faced with ‘life challenges’ such as ADHD, Asperger’s, and Autism can find identifying social queues to be more of a struggle than others.

The first step to understanding body language is knowing that not all of what we are taught as a society is true. Crossing your arms across your chest is thought to be rude and closed off when in reality it is a way for an individual to self soothe (Jung, 2021). Understanding these differences helps people understand one another, especially since most of our communication is nonverbal. The 7-38-55% rule explains how 7% of communication is verbal liking, 38% is vocal, and 55% is facial (Mehrabian, 1971). This study shows that more than half of our understanding of what the other person is portraying is done through body language such as facial expression and hand movement. Studies show those with ‘life challenges’ find identifying emotions to be more laborious due to the difficulty with attributing their own emotions to how others feel (Durham University, 2009). This can cause a mental blockage of relation, making it harder for those who experience this to tell when someone is upset by things, which can also create issues when trying to form relationships. However, just because someone experiences these struggles doesn’t mean that they cannot be taught how to read body language. It simply just requires guidance, and the Support For Student’s Growth Center is the ideal place to receive it.

People need help in all aspects of life, which is why the SSGC offers assistance in many social categories, such as body language. It is important to be aware of what emotions we are making people feel, especially since that is how we maintain and grow relationships around us, and as people, our nonverbal cues are what give us away. Knowing boundaries such as how close to stand is comfortable based on how we are socializing with a person, what those individuals like and don’t like, and how something is making them feel is crucial. When a person’s face changes negatively to a topic, then you’d know to move on and not bring it up again, but if you are not aware of the body language you may continue, accidentally upsetting them more. Everyone deserves to have positive social interaction in life and a fair chance to fully understand those to who they are talking, which is why you shouldn’t let the inability to read body language hold you back. Once taught, it is easy to read social queues, and with the help of the Student Growth Center, you or your child can become an expert in no time.

Dr. Eric J. Nach, Ph.D., M.Ed., A.S.D.C., is a Developmental and Behavioral Specialist who specializes in Autism, ADHD and related disorders. Dr. Nach is the founder of the the Support For Students Growth Center, located in Boca Raton, FL where he and his team of professional’s help develop the Emotional Maturity, Executive Functioning, Life Skill and Social Abilities of young people ages 4 well into the 20’s and their families, including college students and those high school students preparing for college. The CollegeLSP is a subsidiary program of the Support For Students Growth Center, located in Boca Raton, FL and providing services nationwide.

British Library. (n.d.). Retrieved January 12, 2022, from https://www.bl.uk/people/albert-mehrabian

Autism affects ability to read body language – durham university. (n.d.). Retrieved January 12, 2022, from https://www.dur.ac.uk/news/newsitem/?itemno=8449

Survey of American college students, use of & satisfaction with college tutoring services, 2018 – researchandmarkets.com. Survey of American College Students, Use of & Satisfaction with College Tutoring Services, 2018 – ResearchAndMarkets.com | Business Wire. (2018, April 13). Retrieved January 11, 2022, from https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180413005463/en/Survey-of-American-College-Students-Use-of-Satisfaction-with-College-Tutoring-Services-2018—ResearchAndMarkets.com

Frustrated we have solutions

SSG Fall 2021

Download Flyer

Copy of Back to school readiness programs

 

2021 Summer Services

In Person or Live/Online

 

Weekly Social Skills Groups

(back live starting the week of June 14th)

  • 13 unique groupings based on age, ability and needs. (ages 4-adult)
  • We use brainstorming activities, modeling, role-playing and direct instruction to target the specific needs and abilities of each unique group.
  • Each of our 13 unique social skills groups meet weekly for an hour at the same day and time.  (Managing Anxiety in Social Situations, Make and Keep Friends, Join Conversations, Turn Taking, Body Language, Impulse Control, etc.).
  • Wrap-up between counselor and parent after each group
  • Weekly parent support documentation, included.
  • We use our proprietary curriculum for over 90-targeted topics.
  • Initial consult required for new participants (ZOOM or In-Person)

Executive Functioning Programs (1 on 1)

3rd grade-college

  • Personalized, scientifically based, “Executive Functioning Program”, we teach essential skills NOTdirectly taught in school.
  • Through directly coaching “organization skills”, “time management skills”, “critical thinking skills” and “problem solving” abilities, your child can become more teachable, flexible and adaptable to academic and life situations.

College Life Skills Program (1 on 1)

9th grade-college

  • College bound students with characteristics of “Giftedness”, ADHD, Autism, “Asperger’s” or Learning Disabilities can be successful when preparing for and then attending college with our Individualized College Life Skills Program.
  • Self-advocacy, social relationships, time management, organization, hygiene/nutrition, career readiness, prioritizing, “screen” addiction, study skills and more.

Adjusting Back to School Programs

(Groups, live/online and in person)

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BACK TO SCHOOL MINI-PREP PROGRAM!
IN PERSON or LIVE/ONLINE

Fun and eductaional.

For Students Entering Grades 1-5
(Initial Consultation Required for New Participants to Ensure Proper Placement)

Monday July 12th – Thursday July 15th, 2021 and/or

Monday July 19th – Thursday July 23rd, 2021 at 3:30-5:00pm (Ages 5-11)

Program is for 4 consecutive days, $480 (6 hours, includes materials)

We also offer 1 on 1 back to school programming for those who can’t make the group meeting or would benefit from 1 on 1 support. (Additional fee)

MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL READINESS PROGRAM

IN PERSON or LIVE/ONLINE

Fun and educational.

Summer Intensive Program at “The Support for Students Growth Center” of Boca Raton
Initial Consultation Required for New Participants to Ensure Proper Placement

“Middle and High School Readiness Program”

For students ages 11-17 in age appropriate groups

Initial Consultation Required for New Participants to Ensure Proper Placement

$640 per 4 day series (8 hours), Workbook Included

Monday July 26th – Thursday July 29th, 2021 at 3:30-5:30pm (Ages 11-17)

We also offer 1 on 1 back to school programming for those who can’t make the group meeting or would benefit from 1 on 1 support. (Additional fee)

 

ADDITIONAL SERVICES INCLUDE

  • Individual and Family Counseling/Coaching (behavioral and emotional)
  • Educational Consulting
  • Specialized Academic Tutoring

(Services are provided):

  • Via phone and/or text, ZOOM, Facetime, email and in varying combinations
  • In person (as available)
  • Nationwide

Contact Us:

Support for Students Growth Center

https://www.supportforstudentsgrowthcenter.com

5454 Town Center Rd, Suite 7

Boca Raton, FL 33485

561-990-7305

DrNach@SupportForStudentsGrowthCenter.com

 

College Life Skills Program

(as subsidiary program of the S.S.G.C.)

http://collegelsp.com